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New Harbinger Blog for Professionals

Dedicated to providing mental health professionals with the latest in evidence-based psychology research, theory, practical in-session tools, and everything in between.

fiona.hannigan

When you practice mindfulness as a way of life, over time you start to notice that your understanding of what it means will naturally deepen. You may find an increased capacity to respond more flexibly to the present moment both in your personal life and your clinical work. But even when you have intimately experienced and felt the depth of the practice, you may somehow still struggle to describe it or put it into words when necessary for client work.

fiona.hannigan

When you practice mindfulness as a way of life, over time you start to notice that your understanding of what it means will naturally deepen. You may find an increased capacity to respond more flexibly to the present moment both in your personal life and your clinical work. But even when you have intimately experienced and felt the depth of the practice, you may somehow still struggle to describe it or put it into words when necessary for client work.

fiona.hannigan

Values clarification is a critical part of  any psychotherapy session. It may be more challenging for some teens than others, to get in touch with what matters to them. For those who struggle, clinical psychologist Sheri Turrell, PhD, and social worker Mary Bell, MSW, suggest a number of options.

fiona.hannigan

To be a good mindfulness teacher, or even to use mindfulness effectively with your clients, it’s important that you have your own personal practice.

Luckily, the practice of psychotherapy has a number of built-in qualities that present clinicians with ample opportunities to do mindfulness in sessions.

fiona.hannigan

By Randy J. Paterson, PhD

Clients who have been suffering from depression or dysthymia for a long time often have difficulty believing that doing things differently will have a positive impact on their mood. This makes it hard to commit to the work of therapy.

You can cite the research, tell stories of other people’s successes, and invite them to treat therapy as an experiment—“let’s try it and see.” But many still won’t think that anything they do will have a positive impact on their mood.

fiona.hannigan

Here is a free, step-by-step progressive muscle relaxation exercise that you can teach your clients. First, check out Edmund Bourne’s guidelines for practicing PMR effectively. You’ll want to share these with your clients before and after you teach them the exercise. 

An excerpt from Coping with Anxiety: Ten Simple Ways to Relieve Anxiety, Fear, and Worry

fiona.hannigan

When asked to describe their experience, people who suffer from anxiety more commonly cite a cluster of physical symptoms than emotional or mental sensations. Things like shortness of breath, muscle tension, hyperventilation, and palpitations are just a few examples of what people with anxiety may experience during a flare-up.

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