(800) 748-6273

Your cart is empty.

New Harbinger Blog

Cutting-edge & evidence-based mental health resources—from mindfulness, self-help, and parenting tips to practical in-session tools for therapists.


A Letter from Neil D. Brown, LCSW

Parent-teen power struggles are nothing new.  Teenagers pushing back against parental expectations and limits are a normal part of adolescent development.  This is how kids move towards independence and prepare for emancipation. 


Research shows that gender and sexual minorities experience more mental health problems than their heterosexual cis-gender (when assigned sex at birth matches gender identity) counterparts. Here are some best practices that I have found beneficial while working with clients within these communities and for myself as a sexual minority:


“Get it off! Get it off!” The five-year-old girl screams at the top of her lungs. I look in her direction, expecting something horrid on her—like a snake or spider of hideous proportions. On the contrary, she has glue on her fingers. Just a tiny bit of glue coats her middle and ring finger on one hand, something most people wouldn’t even react to. “Okay,” I begin to speak after the initial shock of her sudden outburst subsides. “Let me help you.” I work quickly to help her clean her fingers with a wet rag. The girl smiles and her breathing starts to slow.


Contrary to what you might think, mindful eating isn’t tedious and boring. It’s fun, flavorful, and restores our relationship with our food. This video from the Newsy crew with Dr. Lynn Rossy covers the BASICS of mindful eating, which are:


By Randy Paterson

Clients in their late teens and early twenties increasingly report a sense of paralysis brought about by not knowing their passions. Without such insight, they believe, it is difficult or impossible to move forward in their lives.


By Cedar R. Koons, MSW, LCSW

Your session is almost complete and you and your client are ready to say goodbye. You are both walking to the door and suddenly your client says, “By the way…” and tells you something worrisome. It could be anything from “I’ve decided to go off my medication” to “I just met this woman and we’re getting married!” Why didn’t your client tell you this at the beginning of the session?


by Ann Marie Dobosz, MA, MFT

It’s the start of a new school year. For healthy strivers—kids with big goals and high standards—this is a time of excitement, anticipating the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead. For perfectionists—kids with impossible expectations and intense fear of failure—this is a time of high anxiety.

How can you help your adolescent or college-age child be a healthy striver rather than a destructive perfectionist?