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Quick Tips for Therapists

Part four of a four-part series on emotion efficacy therapy 
Read part one here, part two here, and part three here.

By Matthew McKay, PhD, and Aprilia West, PsyD

Part three of a four-part series on emotion efficacy therapy 
Read part one here and part two here.

By Matthew McKay, PhD, and Aprilia West, PsyD

Part two of a four-part series on emotion efficacy therapy.

Read part one here.

By Matthew McKay, PhD, and Aprilia West, PsyD

Part one of a four-part series on emotion efficacy therapy

By Matthew McKay, PhD, and Aprilia West, PsyD

By Cedar R. Koons, MSW, LCSW

Your session is almost complete and you and your client are ready to say goodbye. You are both walking to the door and suddenly your client says, “By the way…” and tells you something worrisome. It could be anything from “I’ve decided to go off my medication” to “I just met this woman and we’re getting married!” Why didn’t your client tell you this at the beginning of the session?

By Randy J. Paterson, PhD

“Mindfulness” is surely one of the least helpful labels of cognitive experience. Given that we exist twenty-four hours a day within our own skulls, how can we be anything but mindful? The term needs to be explained to clients.

One—though not the only—element of much mindfulness work is a focus on the present moment and sensory experience. A concrete metaphor for this can be more memorable than any description.

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