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Quick Tips for Therapists

Finding someone who matches up with your values is necessary for a healthy and lasting relationship. Helping your client identify their values is key to helping them avoid yet another failed relationship with a narcissist.
 
Many clients who repeat unhealthy relationships with narcissistic partners recognize that they are the common denominator in all these failed relationships, but feel helpless and unsure how to pick a healthy partner. Understanding their own values is key to break the cycle. 

Finding someone who matches up with your values is necessary for a healthy and lasting relationship. Helping your client identify their values is key to helping them avoid yet another failed relationship with a narcissist.
 
Many clients who repeat unhealthy relationships with narcissistic partners recognize that they are the common denominator in all these failed relationships, but feel helpless and unsure how to pick a healthy partner. Understanding their own values is key to break the cycle. 

An important tool for individuals in substance abuse recovery is learning to manage high-risk situations (external or internal situations that cause cravings) and its accompanied triggers. Each high-risk situation has one or several potential triggers. From a mind-body bridging perspective a trigger is a specific event or thought that activates a “requirement” (rules of how oneself, others and world should be), and consequently resulting in an overactive “I-System”.

An important tool for individuals in substance abuse recovery is learning to manage high-risk situations (external or internal situations that cause cravings) and its accompanied triggers. Each high-risk situation has one or several potential triggers. From a mind-body bridging perspective a trigger is a specific event or thought that activates a “requirement” (rules of how oneself, others and world should be), and consequently resulting in an overactive “I-System”.

Part four of a four-part series on emotion efficacy therapy 
Read part one here, part two here, and part three here.

By Matthew McKay, PhD, and Aprilia West, PsyD

Part three of a four-part series on emotion efficacy therapy 
Read part one here and part two here.

By Matthew McKay, PhD, and Aprilia West, PsyD

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