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CBT instructors, it’s time for a change

If you’re teaching CBT, you need this definitive resource to keep in step with the latest advances in behavioral science.

We are pleased to present this exciting new development in cognitive behavioral science. As we all know, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a powerful and evidence-based treatment for mental health conditions, and its applications continue to grow.

However, the proliferation of protocols targeting DSM-defined psychiatric disorders can make training difficult and limit the integration of research and clinical practice.

Featuring contributions from luminaries in behavioral science, Process-Based CBT embraces the behavioral, cognitive, and acceptance and mindfulness wings of this modality. It provides fundamental guidelines for integrating the philosophy and principles of these wings and traditions into a coherent approach to processes of change.

With this volume, students master the full range of core processes modified by CBT, and learn strategies for targeting these processes in practice for maximum efficacy.

Sincerely,

Steven C. Hayes, PhD and Stefan G. Hofmann, PhD, editors

Process-Based CBT represents an important advancement in the field of CBT. It admirably describes how to target relevant and largely transdiagnostic processes to promote healthy growth and development.

— Judith S. Beck, PhD, president of the Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy

Governments and healthcare policy makers, and tens of thousands of psychotherapists around the world, strongly endorse CBT because it works, but it doesn’t always work, and even when it does, it is often not as effective as we would all like. In this remarkable book, two of the leading theorists and clinical scientists in the world, Steven Hayes and Stefan Hofmann, make a strong case that going forward CBT must focus on fundamental transdiagnostic psychopathological processes and core behavioral interventions in what they call the process model of CBT. This is clearly the future of our science and profession.

David H. Barlow PhD, ABPP, professor of psychology and psychiatry emeritus, and founder and director emeritus of the Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders at Boston University

Process-Based CBT

Table of Contents

Introduction

Steven C. Hayes, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Nevada; Stefan G. Hofmann, PhD, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University

Part 1

1. The History and Current Status of CBT as an Evidence-Based Therapy

Stefan G. Hofmann, PhD, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University; Steven C. Hayes, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Nevada

2. The Philosophy of Science as It Applies to Clinical Psychology

Sean Hughes, PhD, Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University

3. Science in Practice

Kelly Koerner, PhD, Evidence-Based Practice Institute

4. Information Technology and the Changing Role of Practice

Gerhard Andersson, PhD, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, and Karolinska Institute

5. Ethical Competence in Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies

Kenneth S. Pope, PhD

Part 2

6. Core Behavioral Processes

Mark R. Dixon, PhD, Ruth Anne Rehfeldt, PhD, Rehabilitation Institute, Southern Illinois University

7. What is Cognition?: A Functional-Cognitive Perspective

Jan De Houwer, PhD, Dermot Barnes-Holmes, DPhil, Yvonne Barnes-Holmes, PhD, Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University

8. Emotions and Emotion Regulation

Anthony Papa, PhD, Clinical Psychology PhD Program and Interdisciplinary Social Psychology PhD Program, University of Nevada; Emerson M. Epstein, MA, Clinical Psychology PhD Program, University of Nevada

9. Neuroscience Relevant to Core Processes in Psychotherapy

Greg J. Siegle, PhD, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh; James Coan, PhD, University of Virginia

10. Evolutionary Principles for Applied Psychology

Steven C. Hayes, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Nevada; Jean-Louis Monestès, PhD, Department of Psychology, LIP/PC2S Lab, University Grenoble Alpes; David Sloan Wilson, PhD, Departments of Biology and Anthropology, Binghamton University

Part 3

11. Contingency Management

Stephen T. Higgins, PhD, Vermont Center on Behavior and Health; Departments of Psychiatry and  Psychological Science, University of Vermont; Allison N. Kurti, PhD, Vermont Center on Behavior and Health; Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont; Diana R. Keith, PhD, Vermont Center on Behavior and Health; Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont

12. Stimulus Control

William J. McIlvane, PhD, University of Massachusetts Medical School

13. Shaping

Raymond G. Miltenberger, PhD, Bryon G. Miller, MS, Heather H. Zerger, MS, Marissa A. Novotny, MS, Department of Child and Family Studies, University of South Florida

14. Self-Management

Edward P. Sarafino, PhD, Department of Psychology, College of New Jersey

15. Arousal Reduction

Matthew McKay, PhD, The Wright Institute, Berkeley, CA

16. Coping and Emotion Regulation

Amelia Aldao, PhD, Andre J. Plate, BS, Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University

17. Problem Solving

Arthur M. Nezu, PhD, Christine Maguth Nezu, PhD, Alexandra P. Greenfield, MS, Department of Psychology, Drexel University

18. Exposure Strategies

Carolyn D. Davies, MA, Michelle G. Craske, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles

19. Behavioral Activation

Christopher R. Martell, PhD, ABPP

20. Interpersonal Skills

Kim T. Mueser, PhD, Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation and Departments of Occupational Therapy, Psychology, and Psychiatry, Boston University

21. Cognitive Reappraisal

Amy Wenzel, PhD, ABPP

22. Modifying Core Beliefs

Arnoud Arntz, PhD, Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam; Department of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University

23. Cognitive Defusion

J. T. Blackledge, PhD, Department of Psychology, Morehead State University

24. Cultivating Psychological Acceptance

John P. Forsyth, PhD, Timothy R. Ritzert, MA, Anxiety Disorders Research Program, Department of Psychology, University at Albany, State University of New York

25. Values Choice and Clarification

Tobias Lundgren, PhD, Andreas Larsson, PhD, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Center for Psychiatry Research, Karolinska Institute; Stockholm health care services

26. Mindfulness Practice

Ruth Baer, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky

27. Enhancing Motivation

James MacKillop, PhD, Peter Boris Centre for Addictions Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University; Homewood Research Institute, Homewood Health Centre; Lauren VanderBroek-Stice, MS, Department of Psychology, University of Georgia; Catharine Munn, MD, MSc, Peter Boris Centre for Addictions Research, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University; Student Wellness Centre, McMaster University

28. Crisis Management and Treating Suicidality from a Behavioral Perspective

Katherine Anne Comtois, PhD, MPH, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington; Sara J. Landes, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, and Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System

29. Future Directions in CBT and Evidence-Based Therapy

Steven C. Hayes, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Nevada; Stefan G. Hofmann, PhD, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University