(800) 748-6273

Your cart is empty.

Sign up for our monthly e-newsletter and receive 20% OFF YOUR NEXT ORDER! Subscribe today >>

Compassion-Focused Therapy

In societies that encourage us to compete with each other, compassion is often seen as a weakness. Striving to get ahead, self-criticism, fear, and hostility toward others seem to come more... More Info
Shyness is a universal human emotion, a blend of fear and interest, and is associated with many positive personality traits: a considerate nature, thoughtfulness, and the ability to be a good... More Info
Anxiety is not your fault. There are many factors that contribute to developing a mind that is prone to intense anxiety, and if you have such a mind, there are many things you can do to change the... More Info
We will all experience anger sometimes—it’s how we deal with it that counts. Anger is one of the most challenging emotions for humans to cope with, and under its influence, we can end up behaving in... More Info
You know the cycle: you have a stressful day and find yourself snacking or overeating at dinner to make yourself feel better. The ritual of eating becomes so calming, you can't stop-and the guilt... More Info
Although many people who have survived trauma, abuse, and violent situations understand on a logical level that the traumatic events they experienced were not their fault, shame may still underlie... More Info
1
2
3
4
5
6

Compassion-focused therapy (CFT) is a form of psychotherapy that emphasizes the development of self-compassion in people who are prone to feelings of shame and self-criticism. Created by Paul Gilbert and his colleagues, this therapy is rooted in Mahayana Buddhist psychology, which considers compassion and mindfulness to be central to healing the mind. CFT develops four skills: compassionate attention, compassionate thinking, compassionate behavior, and compassionate feeling. This therapy has been proven effective for the treatment of eating disorders, depression, anxiety, and other mental health conditions, and can even benefit those who do not suffer from these disorders as it improves emotional regulation, distress tolerance, and non-judgment.

Grid
List