Acceptance | Page 4 | NewHarbinger.com

(800) 748-6273  

M-F  9am - 5pm Pacific

Your cart is empty.

We are open for business and ready to ship your order: Contact Customer Service for More Info >>

Acceptance

This summer, New Harbinger released Advanced Training in ACT: Mastering Key In-Session Skills for Applying Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, an eight-hour workshop in the use of mindfulness and acceptance to treat emotional disorders.

A series of studies have assessed the efficacy of ACT interventions delivered to working individuals, specifically the program outlined in The Mindful and Effective Employee: An Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Training Manual for Improving Well-Being and Performance.

Frank W. Bond, PhD, and Paul E.

College counseling centers (CCCs) have unique needs which influence what kinds of groups are offered and how groups are run. With limited resources and the need for a time-limited treatment model, coupled with increasingly severe and complex problems among the student population, effective short-term interventions are necessary. Because of the variety of presenting problems for which students seek help, it can be difficult to compose a group with members who share a common diagnosis. In fact, it is much more likely and common that group members will carry a variety of diagnoses.

Over the past few weeks, we’ve published a series of posts presenting an overview of Relational Frame Theory (RFT) in terms of history and theoretical foundations. We’ve aimed to provide a basis for understanding the necessity of a theory that can help us understand how language connects us to our environment.

Over the last several weeks we’ve been blogging about relational frame theory (RFT), an approach to understanding the link between human language and behavior. In our RFT 101 series, we've gone over the history, background, and theoretical foundations.

Mindfulness, Acceptance, and Positive Psychology: The Seven Foundations of Well-Being, is the first book to successfully integrate key elements of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and positive psychology to promote healthy functioning in clients.

Two weeks ago we posted a research-round up of studies examining the relationship between psychological flexibility and employees’ mental health and work-related functioning. Psychological flexibility, the general goal of ACT, has proven to be associated with a range of favorable outcomes in the workplace setting, particularly regarding worker’s well-being and effectiveness.

Psychological flexibility, the general goal of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), has been proven by a convincing body of evidence to be associated with a range of favorable outcomes in the workplace setting, particularly regarding worker’s well-being and effectiveness. Studies have repeatedly shown that ACT interventions yield significant improvements in general mental health, and have shown potential for improving work performance indicators such as potential for innovation, and numbers of sick days.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Acceptance