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ACT

By Steven C. Hayes, PhD

Part six of a six-part series on ACT processes

A normal problem-solving mode of mind draws clients into the idea that where they are isn’t desirable and they need to be somewhere else. Jobs need to be changed, relationships fixed. More often than not, therapists go along, but this view directs attention toward getting, not the dynamics of doing.

By Steven C. Hayes, PhD

Part five of a six-part series on ACT processes

If all living creatures in the universe were gone, there would be nothing left of importance. Pollution? Without life, it would not exist as a “problem.” The river does not care. Death? Were the sun to die away, the rock would stand unconcerned.

By Steven C. Hayes, PhD

Part four of a six-part series on ACT processes

We are not who we say we are—snippets and flickers woven into a shredded blanket of “me” that we defend at all costs. The story of who we are (“I am ___(insert content and evaluations here)” is just that: a story.

Part one of a six-part series on ACT processes

By Steven C. Hayes, PhD

Part three of a six-part series on ACT processes

By Steven C. Hayes, PhD

Robyn D. Walser, PhD, author of The Heart of ACT

Letting Go: Opening to Change

By Judith Belmont, MS, LPC

One of the cornerstones of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is to help clients distance themselves from their disturbing thoughts through the process of cognitive defusion.

An example of cognitive defusion is replacing a thought, such as “I am an idiot,” with the thought of “There I go again—having the thought that I am an idiot.”

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