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DBT

The Problem: “Who Am I?”

By Erin Heath, New Harbinger Publications Blog Editor

The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT) Annual Convention is a four-day conference devoted to bringing the cognitive behavioral community together to “stimulate thinking about the myriad issues that surround cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and how it intersects with other disciplines,” as the organization puts it. New Harbinger staff have returned to our Oakland office, letting the experience of the conference sink in.

By Cedar R. Koons, MSW, LCSW

Your session is almost complete and you and your client are ready to say goodbye. You are both walking to the door and suddenly your client says, “By the way…” and tells you something worrisome. It could be anything from “I’ve decided to go off my medication” to “I just met this woman and we’re getting married!” Why didn’t your client tell you this at the beginning of the session?

From "Just Like a Timepiece," Beyond Borderline: True Stories of Recovery from Borderline Personality Disorder, Available Now

To the right of me sat Natalie Portman. To the left of me sat the Crown Prince of Dubai. In front of me stood our Nobel laureate professor. And between them, I sat, holding within me the most infamous personality of all, my borderline personality disorder.

Editor’s note: The following interview is with April West, PsyD, co-author with Matthew McKay, PhD of Emotion Efficacy Therapy: A Brief, Exposure-Based Treatment for Emotion Regulation Integrating ACT and DBT. West is a psychotherapist and emotion researcher based in the San Francisco Bay Area.

 

What is emotion efficacy and what does it mean when someone has low emotion efficacy? 

The goal of psychotherapy should be to increase a client’s psychological flexibility. When it comes to clients with emotion regulation disorders, research shows that experiential avoidance and distress intolerance are the two transdiagnostic factors that are responsible for much of the inflexibility that they experience.

By Britt H. Rathbone, MSSW, LCSW-C

How do you effectively manage phone coaching with adolescents in DBT? By Britt H. Rathbone, MSSW, LCSW-C Therapists often identify phone coaching as a reason they are reluctant to implement dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) with adolescents. They fear that this necessary component of the treatment will be disruptive, unmanageable, and personally overwhelming. How do therapists avoid resentment, anger, and frustration with their clients while being available after hours?

By Sheri Van Dijk, MSW

Clients come to therapy because they require objective feedback that others are unable to give them (or that they are unable to accept from others). The very nature of our work is confronting maladaptive behaviors, but we need to do so in ways that are acceptable to the client, even when the feedback we must provide is painful.

It’s not exactly news that mindfulness-based therapies are effective. A recent meta-analysis including 209 published empirical outcome studies indicated that mindfulness-based treatments in general were effective in treating a variety of psychological disorders, and as effective as cognitive behavior therapy and pharmacological treatments in the nine studies in which they were compared (Khoury et al., 2013).

When it comes to treatment for psychosis, CBT and acceptance- and mindfulness-based approaches have, at times, been assumed to be incongruent with respect to the goals of “control” and “change.” However, in their integration these approaches can complement one another by emphasizing the understanding, exploration, observation, and acceptance of thoughts and feelings rather than the “stopping” and “controlling” of unwanted thoughts and feelings.

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