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emotions

by Fiona Robertson

We’ve all done it. We behave in a way that feels painful, or is destructive, or think we shouldn’t, and we resolve to behave differently in the future. We believe that the way to change behavior A is to take up behavior B. What we discover is that, however fervently we wish to change our behavior, it’s not that easy. We can’t just drop behavior A just because we’ve decided to for whatever reason.

By Adria N. Pearson, Ph.D.

When clients get in touch with difficult emotions in session, crying is a normative behavioral reaction. At times, a client’s level of emotional distress may appear to escalate to an out-of-control level.

Notice your reaction to the client’s emotion, even the thought that it is out of control. If you want to control your client’s emotions, notice this urge and reorient to being with the client in that moment, sitting with him or her compassionately.

For the last several weeks we’ve been presenting views and definitions from a variety of researchers and psychotherapists on the consuming and powerful force commonly referred to as love. We’re just about ready to move on to other subjects (we promise we’ll return to love again, eventually), but need to add one final point.

by Richard Bates

Once I saw mountains as mountains, and rivers as rivers. Then I came to the point where I saw that mountains are not mountains, and rivers are not rivers. But now… I am at rest. For it’s just that I see mountains once again as mountains, and rivers once again as rivers.
Adapted from a translation by D.T. Suzuki in his Essays in Zen Buddhism

I suspect those of you reading this have encountered the words “awareness” or “consciousness” within spiritual teachings and circles before. You may have realised the unchanging nature of “now”. You have reached a place within that cannot be altered by any events happening in either the mental space we call mind or the world of so called external events.

Awareness becomes a topic of conversation on your blog sites and may occupy your attention or non-attention in the waking hours of everyday life.

This Is It. This Is Enough. This Is What It Is (And It Isn’t Anything Else)

by Richard Sylvester 

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