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emotions

By Jennifer Shannon, LMFT

While many parents, teachers, and even teens themselves may view procrastination as a weakness or a sign of being lazy, nothing could be further from the truth. Procrastination is driven by complex emotional needs that vary depending on the individual. I’ve identified four basic types of procrastinators, each with its own motivation for avoiding tasks that need to be done, and its own motivation for engaging with them as well.

By Michael Tompkins, PhD, ABPP

In cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with teens, it’s important that teens not only know how to identify their emotions (e.g., sad, angry, anxious) but also how to quantify the degree or intensity of the emotion they’re feeling. For teens who struggle to do this, you can help them build an Emotion Intensity Scale.

by Fiona Robertson

We’ve all done it. We behave in a way that feels painful, or is destructive, or think we shouldn’t, and we resolve to behave differently in the future. We believe that the way to change behavior A is to take up behavior B. What we discover is that, however fervently we wish to change our behavior, it’s not that easy. We can’t just drop behavior A just because we’ve decided to for whatever reason.

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