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kids

By Elisa Nebolsine, LCSW

Working with kids is always interesting, and often challenging. That’s part of the fun.  One of the common struggles in child therapy is helping kids to understand that they can get through tough situations. Kids are quick to quit and give up when they feel distress, but we can teach skills to help them keep going.

By Janina Scarlet, PhD, author of Dark Agents, Book One

Growing up, I had always longed for a sense of home. Not just a place to live, but more of a place in which I could be safe, loved, and accepted. I was always a shy, awkward kid, who always felt at least ten years older than I actually was, which made making friends with kids my age very challenging.

by Crystal Clarke, RSW, MSW

Is a mindfulness practice really worth it?

Would it have any impact anyway?

How can I fit this into my busy schedule?

“Get it off! Get it off!” The five-year-old girl screams at the top of her lungs. I look in her direction, expecting something horrid on her—like a snake or spider of hideous proportions. On the contrary, she has glue on her fingers. Just a tiny bit of glue coats her middle and ring finger on one hand, something most people wouldn’t even react to. “Okay,” I begin to speak after the initial shock of her sudden outburst subsides. “Let me help you.” I work quickly to help her clean her fingers with a wet rag. The girl smiles and her breathing starts to slow. I take a deep breath myself.

by Ann Marie Dobosz, MA, MFT

It’s the start of a new school year. For healthy strivers—kids with big goals and high standards—this is a time of excitement, anticipating the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead. For perfectionists—kids with impossible expectations and intense fear of failure—this is a time of high anxiety.

How can you help your adolescent or college-age child be a healthy striver rather than a destructive perfectionist?

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