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mindfulness

Editor’s note: The following is a Q&A with Dennis Tirch, PhD, and Laura Silberstein, PhD, co-authors along with Benjamin Schoendorff, MA, MSc of The ACT Practitioner’s Guide to the Science of Compassion: Tools for Fostering Psychological Flexibility. Tirch and Silberstein have collaborated on all responses.  

A Letter from Mark Bertin, MD

By Nick Turner, MSW, Phil Welches PhD

When working with individuals experiencing substance use issues, you will often encounter those who struggle with urges and cravings. Despite a desire to change and taking the initial steps to do so, the person experiences physical, emotional, and cognitive compulsions to use substances, or to use at a level that is not conducive to living a healthy and meaningful life. Urges and cravings are typically experienced as distressing or signs of weakness. Once a person begins to struggle with urges and cravings, those cravings tend to increase in frequency and intensity, which can eventually lead to a lapse back into the substance use cycle.   

Editor's note: The following is the second half of a two-part Q&A with John T. Blackledge, PhD, international ACT trainer, associate professor in the department of psychology at Morehead State University in Kentucky, and author of Cognitive Defusion in Practice: A Clinician’s Guide to Assessing, Observing, and Supporting Change in Your Client. Access part one here.

A recent study published in Medical Care (Serpa, Taylor, Tillisch, 2014) showed that veterans who participated in a nine-week mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program experienced significant reductions in anxiety, depression, and suicidal ideation from baseline to completion of the nine weeks.

Editor’s note: The following is a guest post written by Arnie Kozak, PhD, author of The Awakened Introvert: Practical Mindfulness Skills to Help You Maximize Your Strengths and Thrive in a Loud and Crazy World.

Our folk and research understanding of happiness tends to be expressed in extroverted terms. To be happy is to be having fun, adventure, and social connectivity. A loud party would be the quintessence of fun and, perhaps, the ground source for happiness.

Editor’s note: There are numerous factors to consider when leading a meditation practice. In this four-part series, clinical psychologist Greg Serpa, PhD, and physician turned mindfulness teacher Christiane Wolf, MD, PhD, answer some of the most noteworthy logistical questions about teaching mindfulness. Keep your particular population in mind as you go through their tips; it’s possible that you may have valid reasons to adapt or change the guidelines to suit the needs and experiences of your participants. 

Editor’s note: There are numerous factors to consider when leading a meditation practice. In this four-part series, clinical psychologist Greg Serpa, PhD, and physician turned mindfulness teacher Christiane Wolf, MD, PhD, answer some of the most noteworthy logistical questions about teaching mindfulness. Keep your particular population in mind as you go through their tips; it’s possible that you may have valid reasons to adapt or change the guidelines to suit the needs and experiences of your participants. 

Editor’s note: There are numerous factors to consider when leading a meditation practice. In this four-part series, clinical psychologist Greg Serpa, PhD, and physician turned mindfulness teacher Christiane Wolf, MD, PhD, answer some of the most noteworthy logistical questions about teaching mindfulness. Keep your particular population in mind as you go through their tips; it’s possible that you may have valid reasons to adapt or change the guidelines to suit the needs and experiences of your participants. 

Editor’s note: There are numerous factors to consider when leading a meditation practice. In this four-part series, physician turned mindfulness teacher Christiane Wolf, MD, PhD, and clinical psychologist Greg Serpa, PhD, answer some of the most noteworthy logistical questions about teaching mindfulness. Keep your particular population in mind as you go through their tips; it’s possible that you may have valid reasons to adapt or change the guidelines to suit the needs and experiences of your participants. 

Guiding with eyes open or closed?

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