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Psychological Flexibility

by Glenn Schiraldi, PhD, author of The Resilience Workbook

What is resilience?

Most people already have a sense of what resilience is. In the course of my work, I’ve asked people in many settings what they think of when they think of “resilience.” They’ve said:

by Tim Gordon, MSW, RSW

Psychological flexibility represents the acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) model of health—it's the element we want to foster and grow in our clients while modelling it ourselves as mental health professionals.

by Rochelle I. Frank, PhD, and Joan Davidson, PhD

Editor’s note: This is part one of a two-part exploration of the construction of self-hatred through the lens of contextual behavioral science.

How can transdiagnostic approaches help treat anxiety disorders? By using wisdom from the new and groundbreaking contribution by Michael Tompkins, PhD: Anxiety and Avoidance: A Universal Treatment for Anxiety, Panic, and Fear

A series of studies have assessed the efficacy of ACT interventions delivered to working individuals, specifically the program outlined in The Mindful and Effective Employee: An Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Training Manual for Improving Well-Being and Performance.

Frank W. Bond, PhD, and Paul E.

Two weeks ago we posted a research-round up of studies examining the relationship between psychological flexibility and employees’ mental health and work-related functioning. Psychological flexibility, the general goal of ACT, has proven to be associated with a range of favorable outcomes in the workplace setting, particularly regarding worker’s well-being and effectiveness.

Psychological flexibility, the general goal of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), has been proven by a convincing body of evidence to be associated with a range of favorable outcomes in the workplace setting, particularly regarding worker’s well-being and effectiveness. Studies have repeatedly shown that ACT interventions yield significant improvements in general mental health, and have shown potential for improving work performance indicators such as potential for innovation, and numbers of sick days.

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