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Q&A

Editor’s Note: This is part one of a two-part Q&A with the editors of The ACT Matrix: A new Approach to Building Psychological Flexibility Across Settings and Populations.

Briefly summarize the ACT matrix—it’s purpose and function.

Editor’s Note: This is the final part of a three-part Q&A with Lynne Henderson, PhD, author of Helping Your Shy and Socially Anxious Client: A Social Fitness Training Protocol using CBT. In case you missed them, here are links to part one and part two.

Editor’s Note: This is the second of a three-part Q&A with Lynne Henderson, PhD, author of Helping Your Shy and Socially Anxious Client: A Social Fitness Training Protocol Using CBT

In your book, you present your social fitness model for treating shyness and social anxiety. What are some of the key differentiating factors between this social fitness model and the previously used models for treating shyness and social anxiety?

Editor’s note: this is the second half of a two-part interview with Jason Lillis, PhD, co-author of The Diet Trap: Feed Your Psychological Needs and End the Weight Loss Struggle Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. If you missed part one, you can check it out here.

How can you start making healthier habits by choice?

Editor's Note: This is part one of a two-part Q&A with Jason Lillis, PhD, the author of The Diet Trap: Feed Your Psychological Needs and End the Weight Loss Struggle Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Jason Lillis, PhD, is assistant professor of research at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University and a clinical psychologist at the Miriam Hospital in Providence, RI. He is coauthor of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and a leading ACT-for-weight-loss research scientist.

Editor's Note: This is the second part of a two-part Q&A with one of the authors of ACT and RFT in Relationships, JoAnne Dahl, PhD. If you missed part one, catch up here.

In the book, you talk about self-as-content being a particularly hazardous perspective for people in romantic relationships. Can you elaborate on that?

This summer, New Harbinger released Advanced Training in ACT: Mastering Key In-Session Skills for Applying Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, an eight-hour workshop in the use of mindfulness and acceptance to treat emotional disorders.

Mindfulness, Acceptance, and Positive Psychology: The Seven Foundations of Well-Being, is the first book to successfully integrate key elements of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and positive psychology to promote healthy functioning in clients.

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