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Relational Frame Theory

Therapeutic interventions based on ACT are effective in both increasing worker resilience and enhancing innovation and performance. Circling back to our previous discussions of Relational Frame Theory, understanding how ACT interventions work is a crucial part of understanding the role of relational framing in this context. ACT interventions are designed to impact an individual’s psychological flexibility, that is, one’s ability to contact the present moment without avoidance, enabling persistence of change in behavior in pursuit of values or goals (Hayes, Luoma, Bond, Lillis, & Masuda, 2006).

Last week, we took a brief look at the last sixty-plus years of research in language and experience that have provided the bedrock for current research and development of relational frame theory (RFT) and the link between language and stimulus equivalence.

Two weeks ago we published a question and answer session with the editors of Advances in Relational Frame Theory: Research and Application, Simon Dymond, PhD, and Bryan Roche, PhD. Their edited collection, which published in May of this year, provides a comprehensive overview of the foundations, nature, and implications of RFT, alongside the most up-to-date, cutting-edge research from leaders in RFT and the cognitive and behavioral sciences.

Relational frame theory is a modern behavior analytic approach to language which aims to better understand the link between human language and behavior. To date, the most comprehensive published collection of RFT research is Advances in Relational Frame Theory: Research and Application, edited by Simon Dymond, PhD, and Bryan Roche, PhD.

This spring we published Advances in Relational Frame Theory: Research and Application, a comprehensive resource that explores the connection between language and experience.

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