(800) 748-6273

Your cart is empty.

Sign up for our monthly e-newsletter and receive 20% OFF YOUR NEXT ORDER! Subscribe today »

Research

Editor’s Note: The following is a Q&A with Karen Bluth, PhD, a mindfulness teacher, researcher, and one of the lead authors of a paper published this January in the journal Mindfulness, which examined the efficacy of Learning to BREATHE or L2B, a mindfulness curriculum for adolescents in an alternative school for ethnically diverse, at-risk teens.

As we’ve been discussing over the last few weeks, current trends are shifting away from a symptom-based, disorder-specific approach that prescribes different treatment interventions for separate disorders. Instead, there is increasing interest in and support for an approach that focuses on the common psychological processes underlying presenting symptoms of different disorders that contribute to mental health problems.

In his new book, Mindfulness for Prolonged Grief: A Guide to Healing after Loss When Depression, Anxiety, and Anger Won't Go Away, Sameet Kumar, PhD, highlights the importance of exercise as a part of the grief healing process. Research continues to show that exercise can be neuroprotective, meaning exercise can actually help protect the brain from the effects of aging and distressing mood states (Kramer et al. 2005).

A new study published in the International Journal of Yoga Therapy entitled “iRest Yoga-Nidra on the College Campus: Changes in Stress, Depression, Worry, and Mindfulness” (Eastman-Mueller, Wilson, Jung, Kimura, and Tarrant, 2013) found that the iRest yoga nidra program, developed by psychologist Richard E. Miller, may reduce symptoms of perceived stress, worry, and depression while increasing mindfulness-based skills among college students. In the study, students participated in two hours of the yoga nidra program for a period of eight weeks.

As of 2013, there are twelve anxiety-disorder diagnoses and over twenty-five subtypes and categories of these disorders, with specific treatments for about half of them. Research has demonstrated that these treatments, particularly cognitive behavioral ones (Hofmann and Smits 2008; Norton and Price 2007), help most people recover from anxiety disorders. Over the last few years, however, researchers have studied the effectiveness of general, rather than specific ones for anxiety disorders.

A few weeks ago, we went over some of the basics of the brain that provide a foundation for using mindfulness to treat borderline personality disorder, as outlined in Drs. Blaise Aguirre and Gillian Galen’s new book Mindfulness for Borderline Personality Disorder: Relieve Your Suffering Using the Core Skill of Dialectical Behavior Therapy.

A series of studies have assessed the efficacy of ACT interventions delivered to working individuals, specifically the program outlined in The Mindful and Effective Employee: An Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Training Manual for Improving Well-Being and Performance.

Over the past few weeks  we’ve discussed the adolescent period as a time when mindfulness interventions are an especially good fit, particularly in the college setting.

Psychological flexibility, the general goal of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), has been proven by a convincing body of evidence to be associated with a range of favorable outcomes in the workplace setting, particularly regarding worker’s well-being and effectiveness. Studies have repeatedly shown that ACT interventions yield significant improvements in general mental health, and have shown potential for improving work performance indicators such as potential for innovation, and numbers of sick days.

Subscribe to RSS - Research