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self-compassion

By Ben Sedley, author of Stuff That Sucks

I’d barely pulled out of the gas station into busy Friday afternoon traffic when the rental van stalled and wouldn’t restart. Cars honked their horns as I blocked a lane until finally someone helped push me to the side of the road.

Bringing compassion into therapy is about helping effectively, not just about feeling helpful. In this way, science is core to compassion, and the CFT therapist is likely to draw upon any tools that have good science behind them. In fact, a core value of CFT therapists is not ignoring good science. So if you want to do CFT, you don’t have to give up any of the things you already do that work.

Editor’s note: This is the second half of a two-part exploration of the construction of self-hatred through the lens of contextual behavioral science. For part one, go here.                                                                 

Editor’s note: This is part one of a two-part exploration of the construction of self-hatred through the lens of contextual behavioral science.

Editor's note: This post is written by Steven C. Hayes, PhD, co-founder of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and author of many books including the bestselling Get Out of Your Mind and Into Your Life. This post originally appeared on The Huffington Post.

Is it important to love yourself?

By Leslie Becker-Phelps, PhD

Clients who are frequently self-critical view themselves as flawed, so they are quick to highlight what they perceive as their negative aspects and minimize their positive traits and behaviors, and their strengths. They also struggle in their relationships, feeling that they need to perform well in some way in order for others to accept and value them.

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