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spirituality

By Kamlesh Patel author of The Heartfulness Way

“Sacredness” is another superfine concept in life, like “etiquette,” “reverence,” and “respect.” The word comes from the Latin root sacrare, meaning “holy,” so something is sacred when it deserves veneration because of its Godliness. Sacredness can be about places—like temples and sacred grounds—and it can also be about people, music, ideas, processes, thoughts, and objects like idols. It can be about ceremonies, symbols, geometry, moments, and existence. 

By Gail Brenner, PhD, author of Suffering Is Optional

Many of us who long to awaken to our true nature have ideas about what we will experience. We think that if we’re awake, we’ll be in a state of bliss forever, that nothing bad will ever happen, or that we’ll never again experience difficult feelings.

Here’s the truth: bliss doesn’t last, life presents challenges, and the range of human emotions continues to arise. So what’s absolutely amazing about this? 

By Mark Matousek, author of Writing to Awaken

The quest for meaning includes finding your home in the world. This home may not be geographical. A friend of mine devotes her life to Doctors Without Borders. Though she’s fond of her suburban house in New Jersey, her deepest sense of home comes from being where the greatest need exists.

by Lynn Marie Lumiere, author of Awakened Relating—coming in July 2018!

We are facing global challenges as we move into the 2018 New Year and our world becomes increasingly out of balance. Life is showing us that living within dualistic consciousness and the illusion of separation does not serve us. We are all being called to wake up to the non-dual truth of our shared being and find solutions in an infinite intelligence beyond our conditioned mind.

 

Here at New Harbinger, we strive to develop high quality, evidence-based, affordable tools for mental health, so that there is as little barrier to help as possible. We believe that mental healthcare is a human right, and for more than 40 years, our mission has always been to end the stigma surrounding mental illness.

Because we believe mental healthcare should be accessible to all, we decided to act. This month, we put up a Little Free Library outside our offices in Oakland, California, thereby offering free books to our local community.

Most cognitive behavioral therapy approaches focus on aversive symptoms and problematic behaviors. This emphasis can limit the attention that’s paid to experiences that focus on growth and prosperity, such as a client’s culture and faith. Acceptance and commitment therapy, however, has a marked focus on values-based living, which aims to increase functionality by using values as a compass to do so.

According to the DSM-5, symptoms of psychosis may include delusions, hallucinations, disorganized speech, markedly illogical thinking, or behavior that is grossly disorga­nized or catatonic, as well as diminished emotional expression and avolition (American Psychiatric Association, 2013).

As a mental health professional, part of your practice may be helping people who have serious mental illness.

Editor's Note: Today's post is a contribution by Shelley Scammel, PsyD, licensed clinical psychologist and co-author of Spiritual and Religious Competencies in Clinical Practice: Guidelines for Psychotherapists and Mental Health Professionals

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