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teens

By Jennifer Shannon, LMFT

While many parents, teachers, and even teens themselves may view procrastination as a weakness or a sign of being lazy, nothing could be further from the truth. Procrastination is driven by complex emotional needs that vary depending on the individual. I’ve identified four basic types of procrastinators, each with its own motivation for avoiding tasks that need to be done, and its own motivation for engaging with them as well.

An Interview with Licensed Clinical Social Worker Lisa M. Schab

By Michael Tompkins, PhD, ABPP

In cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with teens, it’s important that teens not only know how to identify their emotions (e.g., sad, angry, anxious) but also how to quantify the degree or intensity of the emotion they’re feeling. For teens who struggle to do this, you can help them build an Emotion Intensity Scale.

By Caren Baruch-Feldman, PhD, author of The Grit Guide for Teens

In my practice, I often work with teens who are adversely affected by stress. Here are the top five strategies that have helped teens combat stress and worry:

1. Give Worry/Anxiety a Name

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