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teens

By Jennifer Shannon, LMFT

In general, praising talents can lead to two problems. First, it can make us cling to the idea of being talented. We want to be aware of how talented we are all the time, and we become afraid of doing anything that might make us think negatively about ourselves. We might even avoid challenging situations. But when we don’t challenge ourselves, we don’t grow.

It isn’t surprising that we’re under the illusion that we own our time. People tend to talk about the future as if it’s a physical thing, something promised to us. Adults tell young people that what they’re doing in the present is simply preparation for an outstanding future career. Studying helps them get into the right university, volunteer work looks good on a résumé, and extracurricular activities will show a future employer that they’re well-rounded.

Evolutionary theory is based on three principles: variation, selection by consequences, and retention. Practitioners can apply these principles to help young people develop their full potential.

In their book, The Thriving Adolescent: Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Positive Psychology to Help Teens Manage Emotions, Achieve Goals, and Build Connection, Louise Hayes, PhD, and Joseph Ciarrochi, PhD, provide many metaphors and different ways to help young people use their model, DNA-V (Discoverer Noticer Advisor – Values), to gain psychological flexibility in their lives.

In ACT, every discussion has a value behind it. Sometimes what a person cares about is explicit; other times it’s hidden. As mental health practitioners, our job is to be on the alert, always asking, “What does the client care about here?”

By Britt H. Rathbone, MSSW, LCSW-C

How do you effectively manage phone coaching with adolescents in DBT? By Britt H. Rathbone, MSSW, LCSW-C Therapists often identify phone coaching as a reason they are reluctant to implement dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) with adolescents. They fear that this necessary component of the treatment will be disruptive, unmanageable, and personally overwhelming. How do therapists avoid resentment, anger, and frustration with their clients while being available after hours?

Sometimes emotions are seen as a sign of weakness and irrationality, but this perception couldn't be further from the truth. They are essential to being rational (Ciarrochi, Chan, & Bajgar, 2001; Ciarrochi, Chan, & Caputi, 2000; Ciarrochi, Forgas, & Mayer, 2001). They’re a way of seeing how events in the world relate to our values, needs, and desires.

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