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teens

The biggest predictor for delinquent behavior, other than prior delinquent behavior, is association with delinquent peers. So what sense does it make to force delinquent kids to associate with each other? If you said none, you are correct.

Nonetheless, we continually try intervention strategies that do just that. How often do you hear of kids being placed in group therapy, group homes, boot camp, and so on? These are very common treatment approaches in today’s world. Whom do you think they are with in these programs?

The concept of changing behavior by changing the environment around a youth is sometimes met with skepticism. However, a child’s behavior does change according to the environment. A child may be loud and aggressive with friends, but most kids do not behave that way at church, or with a grandmother, or around the police. Some environments support offensive behavior, while others do not. If a child is exhibiting delinquent behavior, the goal is to alter the environment around him to one that no longer supports the behavior in question.

When it comes to curbing delinquent behavior in teenagers, a label or diagnosis does not really matter; it is not what will make a child stop drinking, fighting, or engaging in other harmful behaviors. What matters most is what will make the behaviors stop.

Editor’s Note: The following is a Q&A with Karen Bluth, PhD, a mindfulness teacher, researcher, and one of the lead authors of a paper published this January in the journal Mindfulness, which examined the efficacy of Learning to BREATHE or L2B, a mindfulness curriculum for adolescents in an alternative school for ethnically diverse, at-risk teens.

Editor’s note: In recognition of National School Counseling Week, today’s blog post is written by a former school counselor and the author of The Body Image Workbook for Teens, Julia V. Taylor, MA.

Christopher Willard, PhD, is a psychologist and learning specialist in the Boston area who specializes in work with adolescents and young adults in his private practice and at Tufts University. He regularly consults to schools, clinics, and other institutions, and teaches workshops around the US and around the world. He is the author of Mindfulness for Teen Anxiety: A Workbook for Overcoming Anxiety at Home, at School, and Everywhere Else.

Editor’s note: The following is a Q&A with Pat Harvey, ACSW, LCSW-C, and Britt H. Rathbone, ACSW, LCSW-C, authors of Dialectical Behavior Therapy for At-Risk Adolescents: A Practitioner’s Guide to Treating Challenging Behavior Problems.

Why are DBT methods so well-suited for teens’ emotions and psychological development?

Teens with autism face unique challenges when it comes to school and friends. But what many people may be surprised to learn is that teens with autism can also have a natural gift for acting. In their new book, The Autism Playbook for Teens, Irene McHenry and Carol Moog seek to empower autistic teens with a fun, creative, strengths-based approach using mindfulness strategies and scripts. These imaginative exercises are designed to help teens on the autism spectrum manage emotions, reduce anxiety, and form meaningful connections with others.

Happy Friday! Today, we’re giving away Child and Adolescent Clinical Psychopharmacology Made Simple to the first 20 respondents.

Child and Adolescent Clinical Psychopharmacology Made Simple is the only resource parents and professionals need to consult for the most up-to-date information on medications for the treatment of children and teens suffering from psychological disorders.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), developed by Marsha Linehan to teach clients emotional regulation and coping skills, was first used with adult patients who responded to emotional pain with self-harming mechanisms, like cutting, engaging in intentionally dangerous behaviors, or attempting suicide. Today we’re taking a look at how DBT helps teens and adolescents develop healthier coping skills and responses to emotional duress and discover new ways to work through their pain.

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