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teens

Teens with autism face unique challenges when it comes to school and friends. But what many people may be surprised to learn is that teens with autism can also have a natural gift for acting. In their new book, The Autism Playbook for Teens, Irene McHenry and Carol Moog seek to empower autistic teens with a fun, creative, strengths-based approach using mindfulness strategies and scripts. These imaginative exercises are designed to help teens on the autism spectrum manage emotions, reduce anxiety, and form meaningful connections with others.

Happy Friday! Today, we’re giving away Child and Adolescent Clinical Psychopharmacology Made Simple to the first 20 respondents.

Child and Adolescent Clinical Psychopharmacology Made Simple is the only resource parents and professionals need to consult for the most up-to-date information on medications for the treatment of children and teens suffering from psychological disorders.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), developed by Marsha Linehan to teach clients emotional regulation and coping skills, was first used with adult patients who responded to emotional pain with self-harming mechanisms, like cutting, engaging in intentionally dangerous behaviors, or attempting suicide. Today we’re taking a look at how DBT helps teens and adolescents develop healthier coping skills and responses to emotional duress and discover new ways to work through their pain.

The support and understanding of parents if often vital to successful Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) treatment for adolescents; however, parents (or parental figures) may feel a range of negative emotions surrounding the child and the therapeutic intervention, like shame, guilt, anger, or helplessness. Working with parents to create an open, compassionate environment where their feelings are validated helps ensure that everyone is focused on the recovery of the adolescent—and, by extension, the entire family.

Raychelle Cassada Lohmann, MS, LPC, is a National Board Certified Counselor and a Licensed Professional Counselor who specializes in counseling students at the middle and high school levels. Her new book, The Bullying Workbook for Teens, which she coauthored with Julia V. Taylor, MA, incorporates cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to help ease anxiety, fear, stress, and other emotions associated with being bullied.

Over the past few weeks  we’ve discussed the adolescent period as a time when mindfulness interventions are an especially good fit, particularly in the college setting.

A steady flow of new and emerging research continues to suggest that mindfulness offers great benefits to health and well-being. It shifts the nature of our relationship to experience and we now know that cultivating an even-handed and openhearted stance toward life can strengthen emotional balance, resilience, and interpersonal effectiveness; skills we can all use throughout our lives in and beyond the classroom.

A new study published in the latest issue of Research in Human Development, “The Effectiveness of the Learning to BREATHE Program on Adolescent Emotion Regulation” (Metz, Frank, Reibel, Cantrell, Sanders, and Broderick, 2013), assessed the effectiveness of Learning to BREATHE (L2B), the mindfulness-based program for adolescent emotion regulation that is outlined in one of this summer’s most exciting new titles, Learning To BREATHE: A Mindfulness Curriculum for Adolescents to Cultiv

A Letter from Louise Hayes, PhD and Joseph Ciarrochi, PhD

Popular media depicts the ‘Net Generation’ as self-centered and largely focused on status updates, posts, and texting. The reality is far from this. Our work with young people has shown that they often feel disconnected, believing the world sees them as ‘problems to be solved.’ We want something better for them.

By Lucie Hemmen, PhD

Teens are usually unaware of how harsh their thoughts about themselves (and others) can be. Spark awareness by offering your honest feedback: “Wow, Emma. You can be really mean to yourself with your thinking, can’t you?” Emma will likely register mild surprise or curiosity about your reaction. You can deepen her understanding by asking, “If someone you loved was struggling with your situation, how would you treat them?” Teens immediately grasp the incongruence.

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