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mindfulness

This summer, New Harbinger released Advanced Training in ACT: Mastering Key In-Session Skills for Applying Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, an eight-hour workshop in the use of mindfulness and acceptance to treat emotional disorders.

How can transdiagnostic approaches help treat anxiety disorders? By using wisdom from the new and groundbreaking contribution by Michael Tompkins, PhD: Anxiety and Avoidance: A Universal Treatment for Anxiety, Panic, and Fear

Using mindfulness to treat the suffering that comes with the symptoms of borderline personality disorder is a difficult task because it requires you to attend to what’s going on in your mind. The explicit application of mindfulness used in dialectical behavior therapy provided a way for people with BPD to get unstuck from their judgments and the intense emotions that lead to suffering.

In recent years, developments in neuroscience have offered significant breakthroughs in understanding the brain chemistry that contributes to the behaviors and suffering associated with borderline personality disorder. While mindfulness cannot change your genes, research is beginning to show that it can change the way your genes work (Smalley 2010).

A series of studies have assessed the efficacy of ACT interventions delivered to working individuals, specifically the program outlined in The Mindful and Effective Employee: An Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Training Manual for Improving Well-Being and Performance.

Frank W. Bond, PhD, and Paul E.

By Steven C. Hayes, PhD, author of Get Out of Your Mind and Into Your Life

Over the past few weeks  we’ve discussed the adolescent period as a time when mindfulness interventions are an especially good fit, particularly in the college setting.

College counseling centers (CCCs) have unique needs which influence what kinds of groups are offered and how groups are run. With limited resources and the need for a time-limited treatment model, coupled with increasingly severe and complex problems among the student population, effective short-term interventions are necessary. Because of the variety of presenting problems for which students seek help, it can be difficult to compose a group with members who share a common diagnosis. In fact, it is much more likely and common that group members will carry a variety of diagnoses.

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